Join Writing and Publishing After-school Classes in West San Jose

This fall, Lekha brings essay writing, creative writing, and publishing after-school classes to San Jose for students in grade 2-12.

Tuesdays, 5:15PM – 6:15PM
Advanced Publishing, grades 7 – 12

Tuesdays, 6:30PM – 7:30PM
Essay Writing, grades 3 – 5

Thursdays, 5:15PM – 6:15PM
Intermediate Publishing, grades 5 – 12

Thursdays, 6:30PM – 7:30PM
Essay Writing, grades 6 – 8

Fridays, 5:15PM – 6:15PM
Beginning Creative Writing, grades 2 – 3

Fridays, 6:30PM – 7:30PM
Intermediate Beginner Publishing, grades 4 – 5

Writing Camps Starting in June

Foster City
6/29 – 7/2
Creative Writing 105441-A, 5 – 9 yrs

Fremont
6/15 – 6/19
Creative Writing 225389, 8 – 12 yrs
The Fundamental Essay 226981, 8 – 12 yrs
Both Creative Writing & The Fundamental Essay 226634, 8 – 12 yrs

6/29 – 7/3
Creative Writing 226633, 8 – 12 yrs
The Fundamental Essay 225395, 8 – 12 yrs
Both Creative Writing & The Fundamental Essay 226632, 8 – 12 yrs

Menlo Park
6/29 – 7/3
Creative Writing Writing Conventions, 7 – 13 years

Millbrae
6/22 – 6/26
Create-A-Book 15006, 5 – 9 yrs
The Art of Storytelling 15007, 5 – 9 yrs
Both Create-A-Book & The Art of Storytelling 15018, 5 – 9 yrs

Milpitas
6/22 – 6/26
Create-A-Book, 5 – 7 yrs
The Art of Storytelling, 6 – 9 yrs
Creative Writing, 7 – 13 yrs
Essay Writing, 7 – 13 yrs

Pacifica
6/29 – 7/2
Create-A-Book I 50.380, 5 – 9 yrs
The Art of Storytelling 30.348, 5 – 9 yrs
Story Writing 50.380, 7 – 12 yrs
Essay Writing 50.382, 7 – 12 yrs

San Carlos
6/29 – 7/2
Story Writing 29183, 7 – 13 yrs
Essay Writing 29176, 7 – 13 yrs

San Ramon
6/29 – 7/2
Create-A-Book I 93894, 5 – 7 yrs
Early Reading 93863, 5 – 7 yrs
Create-A-Book II & III 93895, 8 – 12 yrs
The Fundamental Essay 93864, 8 – 12 yrs
Story Writing 94561, Middle School
Academic Writing 94560, Middle School

West San Jose
6/22 – 6/26
Creative Writing, 7 – 10 yrs
Essay Writing, Middle School

6/29 – 7/2
Story Writing, 7 – 10 yrs
Persuasive Essay & Opinion Essay Writing, Middle School

Camps are starting soon!
Register Now!

Write With Lekha This Summer

At 12 locations around the Bay Area, Lekha teaches students in grades K–12 the art of academic writing, creative writing, and mass communications.

Check out our schedules in Cupertino, Foster City, Fremont, Menlo Park, Millbrae, Milpitas, Pacifica, Redwood City, San Carlos, San Ramon, Walnut Creek, and West San Jose.

Camps are filling up quickly, so register today!

View Schedules and Register

Young Writers Learn Publish at Lekha

Create-A-Book teaches the art of bookmaking and book illustration. While creating books of different types, students will infuse their stories with descriptive language, creating vibrant pictures in the reader’s mind.

Writing and Publishing teaches students how to convert their short stories into longer stories. The art of illustrations for the intermediate reader will also be discussed. Students will work towards publishing their own picture book, early reader, short story collection, chap book (collection of poetry), or comic. Some students may work towards finishing a chapter book.

Cupertino
7/26 – 7/31: Writing & Publishing, Two Sessions: 7 – 10 years, Middle School
8/3 – 8/7: Writing & Publishing II, Two Sessions: 7 – 10 years, Middle School

Fremont
6/22 – 6/26: Create-A-Book, 5 – 9 years

Menlo Park
7/20 – 7/24: Writing & Publishing, 7 – 13 years

Millbrae
6/22 – 6/26: Create-A-Book, 5 – 9 years

Milpitas
6/22 – 6/26: Create-A-Book, 5 – 7 years

Pacifica
6/29 – 7/2: Create-A-Book, 5 – 9 years

San Ramon
6/29 – 7/2: Create-A-Book I, 5 – 7 years
6/29 – 7/2: Create-A-Book II & III, 8 – 12 years

West San Jose
7/6 – 7/10: Writing and Publishing, Two Sessions: 7 – 10 years, Middle School
7/13 – 7/17: Writing & Publishing II, Two Sessions: 7 – 10 years, Middle School
Dates TBD: Publishing Intensive, Call (408) 429-8880 for details

Bringing Joy to Writing

This summer, Lekha teaches students ages 5–13 the art of writing. Through our academic writing and creative writing camps, we teach students tried-and-true writing techniques with our scholarly and creative approach, making sure kids have fun in the process.

For students interested in publishing their writing, we are teaching a series of publishing camps this summer. While learning how to develop their short stories into picture books or chapter books, students will work towards publishing their very own books.

Learn more about our writing camps in Cupertino, Fremont, Menlo Park, Millbrae, Milpitas, Pacifica, Redwood City, San Carlos, San Ramon, Walnut Creek and West San Jose.

Camps are filling up quickly, so register today!

Register Today

4/26: Lekha Writing Center at Om Run 2015

On Sunday, April 26, find for Lekha Writing Center at Om Run 2015. Sign up for summer writing  camps while you’re there and receive a special 10% discount.

Om Run 2015

April 26, 2015
8:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.

Hellyer County Park, San Jose
Map and directions

Visit the Om Run site for more information.

Writing Workshops This Weekend and Beyond

Lekha’s founder, Jyoti Yelagalawadi, will cover Overcoming Writer’s Block, Breaking Down the Opinion Essay, Reading Comprehension, and Working Dialogue into your Narrative Essays.

Each workshop lasts two and one half hours. Price is $25 per participating child. Parents are welcome to sit in.

A special 10% discount is offered to families who sign up for summer writing camp at one of our workshops. Additional discounts are offered when signing up for multiple sessions (10% off) and siblings (5% off). An additional discount for early registration is offered until April 15th.

Cupertino

Saturday, March 14
9:30am – 12:00pm: Grades 2 – 4
1:00pm – 3:30pm: Grades 4 – 8
Overcoming Writer’s Block: What is writer’s block? Why does it happen? Can writer’s block be overcome? If so, how? This workshop is designed for students of upper elementary and middle school students.
at Little Champs, 1025 South De Anza Boulevard, San Jose, CA 95129, map »

West San Jose, Moorpark

Sunday, March 15
10:00am – 12:30pm: Grades 2 – 4
1:00pm – 3:30pm: Grades 4 – 8
Reading Comprehension: Determine the theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize the text. This workshop is designed for elementary school students.
at Little Champs, 5178 Moorpark Ave, San Jose, CA 95129, map »

Register Now

More Workshops Coming Soon

West San Jose, Moorpark, 3/21
Cupertino, 3/22
San Jose, 4/19
Cupertino, 4/12
Danville, 4/11
Menlo Park, 4/18
Redwood City, TBD
Milpitas, TBD

Story through Dialogue, Part 7: Mystery

It is very common in mystery stories for there to be dialogue in which the detective interviews the victim of the crime of mystery, the suspects, and the witnesses. Through these interviews, the detective is able to gather information about what the crime or mystery is; who may have witnessed the crime or mystery; who had a motive to commit the crime; and where to find clues and/or other people (witnesses and suspects) to speak with to get more information and solve the crime or mystery.

Common Interview Questions

If the person you are interviewing is a suspect, start with these basic questions:

  • What is your name?
  • How do you know the victim (use the victim’s name)?
  • Did you have a good relationship with the victim?
  • Where were you at the time the crime was committed?
  • What were you doing at the time the crime was committed?
  • Can anyone prove that you were in the place you say you were at the time the crime was committed? If so, who?
  • Do you know anyone who might be angry or upset with the victim?
  • Was he or she having any problems with anyone? If so, what is that person’s name and relationship to the victim?
  • Where can I reach you if I have further questions?

Always thank the witness at the end of the interview. Remember that even if the detective rules out someone as a suspect at the beginning of the story, that person might still be the actual criminal. He or she could be lying in the interview. So, during the interview, it is important for the detective to also pay attention to the way the interviewee acts.

Some Signs that an Interviewee Might be Lying

  • Sweating
  • Being unable to look the detective in the eye
  • Shaking or fidgeting (tapping their foot, jingling their keys, fiddling with their jewelry, etc.)
  • Hesitation before answering questions
  • Gulping or stuttering when answering questions
  • Having a story that keeps changing or doesn’t make sense
  • Having a story that has details that contradict the facts or what the other interviewees have said

Activity: Interview Freewrite

Now, create at least one interview between the detective of your mystery and the victim, a suspect, or a witness. Keep the common interview questions in mind.

Upcoming Lekha Writing Workshops

Lekha’s founder, Jyoti Yelagalawadi, will cover Overcoming Writer’s Block, Breaking Down the Opinion Essay, Reading Comprehension, and Working Dialogue into your Narrative Essays.

Each workshop lasts two and one half hours. Price is $25 per participating child. Parents are welcome to sit in.

A special 10% discount is offered to families who sign up for summer writing camp at one of our workshops. Additional discounts are offered when signing up for multiple sessions (10% off) and siblings (5% off). An additional discount for early registration is offered until April 15th.

Cupertino

at Little Champs, 1025 South De Anza Boulevard, San Jose, CA 95129, map »Saturday, March 14
10:00am – 12:30pm and 1:30pm – 4:00pm
Overcoming Writer’s Block: What is writer’s block? Why does it happen? Can writer’s block be overcome? If so, how? This workshop is designed for students of upper elementary and middle school students.

Sunday, March 22
10:00am – 12:30pm
Breaking Down the Opinion Essay: This workshop will focus on the do’s and don’t’s of an opinion essay in language appropriate for upper elementary and middle school students.

Sunday, March 22
1:00pm – 3:30pm
Reading Comprehension: Determine the theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize the text. This workshop is designed for elementary school students.

West San Jose, Moorpark

at Little Champs, 5178 Moorpark Ave, San Jose, CA 95129, map »

Sunday, March 15
10:00am – 12:30pm and 1:00pm – 3:30pm
Reading Comprehension: Determine the theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize the text. This workshop is designed for elementary school students.

Saturday, March 21
10:00am – 12:30pm, 1:00pm – 3:30pm, and 4:00pm – 6:30pm
Working Dialogue into your Narrative Essays: This workshop will focus on best practices of narrative writing in a language appropriate for 2nd–4th grade students.

Register Now

More Workshops Coming Soon

San Jose, 4/19
Cupertino, 4/12
Danville, 4/11
Menlo Park, 4/18
Redwood City, TBD
Milpitas, TBD

Story through Dialogue, Part 6: Science Fiction and Fantasy

Dialogue in science fiction stories generally include very specialized scientific or technological terms and reference alien or scientifically altered/created creatures. Technological weapons and ships have specific names like “light sabers” or the “Death Star”. Similar to the special language that is used in the conversations between science fiction characters, characters in fantasy stories also have specialized language that is particular to the world in which the story is set. In the J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter series, the students at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry discuss magical spells, items, and powers which they are learning or using. There are certain words used to refer to non-magical people (Muggles), magical creatures (Dementors), and magical sports (Quidditch) in Harry Potter’s world that do not exist in our world.

In some instances, writers will write characters who speak a language which the writer has invented. J.R.R. Tolkien, for example, created the Elvish language (Tengwar) which appears in his novels The Hobbit and Lord of the Rings. In Star Trek, the science fiction television series and movie franchise, writers contributed to the creation of the Klingon language, which is spoken by the warrior alien race, the Klingons. Both of these languages were based, in part, on the Tibetan writing system.

Activity: Create Your Own Language

Now, create a language of your own. Imagine what your alien or magical characters might say that helps to reveal the characteristics of that alien culture or magical world. How would the language sound?

Then think about when you would have characters saying in this special language. Are they speaking the special language because they are trying to keep what they want to say a secret from someone else who may be listening? Are they speaking it to each other because they want to show brotherhood or kinship? Or are they speaking it for some other reason. You decide!

Name of your language:

Name of the people who speak the language:

Write a dialogue between someone speaking your new language and a person or creature speaking English. Do the two people need a translator? If they both can understand one another, what kind of clues can you give the reader about what the person speaking your created language is saying? The response in English by the English speaker should suggest to the reader what the other character said.

Next Tuesday, we’ll address writing dialogue for Mystery genres.